Can One Who Hates Justice Govern

“Jesus would, in actual fact, have been an enemy of the state if He had not dared to call King Herod a ‘fox’ (Luke 13:32). If the State has perverted its God-given authority, it cannot be honored better than by this criticism which is due it in all circumstances.”
– Karl Barth

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A Convenient Pretense

Perhaps you have seen the Low Carbon Diet fliers in either Hicks dining hall, or at the Map Dining hall. If Bon Appetite’s management feels it is necessary to provide info on a “low carbon diet”, clearly American culture is captivated by visions of cataclysmic climate change. As Americans become more conscious of their so-called […]

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The Corporate Social Responsibility Distortion

by Dave Gernhard Corporations, business, CEOs, these are terms that in the modern context conjure up images of greed and corruption.  Gone is the layman who risks everything to build an industrial empire for the benefit of the consumer.  Richard Sears, Henry Ford, and Thomas Edison have been replaced by Ken Lay of Enron and […]

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Why Microfinance is not all its cracked up to be.

By Abhilash Samuel             “An unacceptably high proportion of the world’s population lives in dreadful conditions that consign them to Malthusian lives that are nasty, brutish and short”, says Norbert Kloppenburg, the senior vice president of KfW Entwicklungsbank, a microfinance institution based in Germany.[1] The alleviation of poverty through banking, or more precisely the provision […]

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Intellectual Property Rights: Can you own an idea?

By Blake Imeson  Intellectual Property rights (IP) have long been a hindrance to the advance of society, giving advantages benefitting a few. This paper seeks to correct the view of IP as essential to our society and expose them to be what they really are.                 Government intervention in the dissemination of ideas has stunted […]

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Pro Sports as a Public Good

By Dave Gernhard The following is taken from a paper submitted by the author for the Austrian Student Scholars Conference at Grove City College on Nov. 3, 2007… … Many different arguments have been used to advocate government funding of professional sports. Roger Noll and Andrew Zimblast write in their book Sports, Jobs, and Taxes, […]

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The Problem of Nonrivalrous Consumption in the Free Market

by Dave Gernhard A major aspect of public goods theory is the idea of nonrivalrious consumption. This refers to cases where an “individuals’ ability to consume a good or service is not diminished by allowing additional individuals to consume it.”[i] Some simple examples of this are movie theaters or sports arenas. The cinema can admit […]

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The Problem of Externalities in the Free Market

by Dave Gernhard An externality exists whenever the action of an individual brings added costs or benefits to another individual. Phrased differently, externalities exist when the participants of an action don’t reap all the costs or all the benefits of that action. An example of this can be the nocturnal bagpipe player who waits until […]

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School Vouchers: A Step Backwards?

By Elizabeth Imeson If indeed, "competition is merely the absence of oppression"*, than lack of competition is oppression. On the surface, the school voucher system seems appealing to those who are for the free market. But when further prodding is done, reality is discovered — "Under the voucher system public education remains public education, and […]

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Free Markets and the Third World

By Abhilash Samuel Private property, free enterprise, free market principles are principles that might sound routine to most Americans. However, the third world often receives this jargon with hostility. Nevertheless, as a resident of the third world for twenty-one years, I feel, putting these principles into practice could be revolutionary in the least. Today, America, […]

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